1.14.2006

Some Short Takes on the Long View

A couple of pieces in CounterPunch caught my eye. The first is "A (Short) Congressional Honor Roll" by Dave Lindorff. Clip:
In a legislature full of gutless cowards and corporate bootlickers, that handfull of people of courage who genuinely care that the White House is sucking the life out of the Constitution like a bloated leech should be held up to public acclaim.

So here they are:

On House Resolution 635, calling for formation of a Select Committee, the co-sponsors are Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), Rep. Lynn Woolsey (D-CA), Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY), Rep. Shiela Jackson Lee (D-TX), Rep. Lois Capps (D-CA), Rep. Donald Payne (D-NJ) and Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA).

On H.R. 636, calling for censure of President Bush, the co-sponsors are Rep. Waters, Rep. Woollsey, Rep. Rangel, and Rep. Lofgren.

On H.R. 637, calling for censure of Cheney, the same four co-sponsors of H.R. 636 are joined by Rep. Jackson Lee.

For those who want more information about the bills, I suggest going to CensureBush.org.
But where are folks like Barbara Lee, Barney Frank, Henry Waxman, and Dennis Kucinich????

The other very interesting, 'though at times confusing, CounterPunch article is JoAnn Wypijewski's "What is an Antiwar Movement?" Excerpt:
. . . the political terrain on the left today is desolate, so the fact that a majority of the country opposes the war, and hundreds of organizations across the country act against it is kind of remarkable. Somehow it doesn't seem to be the best tactical approach, given the conditions, to try to destroy that by enforcing a broader agenda from on high. Should these little organizations have fora and debates etc. on the broader issues? Sure. But I don't think there's much useful to come from detailed pronunciamentoes from ANSWER and UFPJ headquarters.

It doesn't seem that we have learned enough about human nature, about exhaustion and despair and false dreams, about the power of the state to kill or dismantle opposition, about the seductiveness of capital and the fruits of co-optation, and about how all of these combine to stop the train at the point of limited liberal reform and then roll back. It would be a really limited victory to force US withdrawal from Iraq. Would it not be a victory? (Lenni Brenner seems to assume that it's only Zionism that's the real hang-up among antiwar forces; when the US leaves Iraq and it becomes a theocratic state that stones women and gays, don't you think there will be recriminations and denunciations among all those peace people now who only reluctantly have come to support the Out Now! position? There are divisions like crazy among people who oppose the war.) It might be a "limited victory" to make every Congress person who supported the war either climb down the way Murtha has or be chucked from power, but would it not be a victory all the same? Would there not be many other battles remaining? The problem is in thinking any victory is final, and therefore in believing every battle must engage every ill for that final victory.
My best find of the day, however, is this Reuters/AOL News story, "Vampire Seeks Job as Minnesota Governor". Giggles and snorts:
"Politics is a cut-throat business," said Jonathon "The Impaler" Sharkey, who said he plans to announce his bid for governor Friday on the ticket of the Vampyres, Witches and Pagans Party . . .

"I'm a satanist who doesn't hate Jesus," Sharkey told Reuters. "I just hate God the Father."

However, he claims to respect all religions and if elected, will post "everything from the Ten Commandments to the Wicca Reed" in government buildings.

Sharkey also pledged to execute convicted murders and child molesters personally by impaling them on a wooden pole outside the state capitol.
Since we have a werewolf as preznut, Frankenstein in the veep chair, and a congress full of zombies, I really don't have a problem with this. I mean, he sounds like just a zealous law-and-order candidate with a strange taste in beer.